America’s Wildlife: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

nam_coverThe struggle to preserve America’s wildlife is an amazing tale of national and natural history. It is a story of what we can accomplish when we work together toward a common goal. This curriculum will help you bring this story to your students.

The curriculum is intended for high school science and social studies classrooms. It consists of five interactive lessons set to state and national standards.

Due to numerous requests from our partners and to help commemorate 75 years of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration programs, we have just released a collection of new activities that teach important wildlife conservation concepts in an informal setting. These three stand-alone activities are perfect for zoos, museums, summer camps and so many more non-traditional academic environments. They can even be used as extension activities for the regular classroom unit.

America’s Wildlife: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow took second place in Education at the 2010 Association of Conservation Information awards. It has been distributed to educators in more than 40 states.

The curriculum is free. However, we do ask that you complete a short form before downloading. To access the materials, click on the link below.


ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  • What resources appear to be endless today and how do we use and regulate those resources?
  • Who owns wildlife and what responsibilities come with that ownership?
  • How does our understanding of wildlife science influence wildlife management and wildlife law?
  • How are wildlife management and conservation funded and what would happen to wildlife if those funds were lost?
  • What specific actions by various U.S. citizens shaped wildlife conservation?
  • How did human attitudes toward natural resources evolve from exploitation to stewardship?
  • In what ways can individuals take action to affect positive change?
  • What are some conservation challenges that wildlife face today? What are possible solutions to today’s wildlife conservation issues?

STANDARDS CORRELATION

Because this unit covers five lessons and each lesson addresses multiple standards, we cannot list all of them here. However, the unit does correlate to specific performance objectives in the high school science strands 2, 3 and 4 as well as high school social studies strands 1, 3 and 4.

 

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